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National Firewood Association or North American Firewood Association?

NFA Member Logo

Hi All

We just joined the NFA (National Firewood Association) https://nationalfirewoodassociation.org

Through based in the United States they have the same message as we do. From their website:

“The NFA cannot defend a smoldering, stinky wood fire. At the most basic level, that’s all we’re talking about. If there weren’t so many people weren’t doing a such a poor job of burning wood, no one would probably ever have brought it up.

The increasing availability of clean burning, high-efficiency wood stoves helps.

But if we don’t all do a better job of using these tools, our ability to burn wood will continue to invite attack. Our goal at the NFA is simply stated — to portray dense wood smoke pouring from a chimney or wood fire as a red flag that says “Someone here doesn’t know what the hell they’re doing.”

We encourage friends and neighbors to find a way to help offenders understand that they’re wasting wood and suggest that there may be simple ways to significantly improve emissions. Assure them that replacing the stove as the last thing on your mind.

Start with verifying the moisture content of the wood being burned. Examine the stove and the chimney. Simple issues like minor air leaks can cause major problems. Get a professional opinion on the chimney. Make sure that physics is on your side.

The choice of stove itself is all but irrelevant if these basic requirements are not met — and they frequently are not. The worst part of the entire scena rio is that burning wood could be regulated out of existence before its full potential is ever realized.

Help the NFA clean up our own backyard.”

In summary, if the correct firewood is used (seasoned, which is 20% moisture or less) in the correct wood burning appliance (wood stove, boiler, fire pit etc. that provides enough oxygen for a complete burn) then there should not be any concerns regarding, pollution, particulate or smoke.